Tag Archives: WWF

New Website Have A Look

So basically when I was doing my HND we had a brief to create a website for ourselves, overall I wasn’t happy with this at all so I have taken it upon myself to create myself a more professional site, in which possible clients etc. can contact me on and look into myself abit more.

I will be updating this site all the time and it isn’t 100% yet, I have a lot more planned.

So if you get a chance have a look on: http://alexrichardson93.wix.com/alexrichardsondesign

Any questions or know how contact me on either the new site or via here!

Thanks

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WWF causes

So for my design I need to basically pick a topic/ cause that I believe in and that I want to use, I have always been interesting in rhino’s just something about them so right now i am pretty set to do something with them.

Picture 25

https://worldwildlife.org/species/black-rhino

Seeing that there are different types of rhino’s I thought that It would be best for me to collect a screenshot and the web link for each one for future reference.

Picture 26

https://worldwildlife.org/species/white-rhino

A bit of information collected about them from WWF:

Rhinos once roamed many places throughout Eurasia and Africa and were known to early Europeans who depicted them in cave paintings. Long ago they were widespread across Africa’s savannas and Asia’s tropical forests. But today very few rhinos survive outside national parks and reserves. Two species of rhino in Asia– Javan and Sumatran – are Critically Endangered. A subspecies of the Javan rhino was declared extinct in Vietnam in 2011. A small population of the Javan rhino still clings for survival on the Indonesian island of Java. Successful conservation efforts have helped the third Asian species, the greater one-horned (or Indian) rhino, to increase in number. Their status was changed from Endangered to Vulnerable, but the species is still poached for its horn.

In Africa, Southern white rhinos, once thought to be extinct, now thrive in protected sanctuaries and are classified as Near Threatened. But the Northern white rhino subspecies is believed to be extinct in the wild and only a few captive individuals remain in a sanctuary in Kenya. Black rhinos have doubled in number over the past two decades from their low point of 2,480 individuals, but total numbers are still a fraction of the estimated 100,000 that existed in the early part of the 20th century.

Why they Matter?

In almost all rhino conservation areas, there are other valuable plants and animals. The protection of rhinos helps protect other species including elephants, buffalo, and small game. Rhinos contribute to economic growth and sustainable development through the tourism industry, which creates job opportunities and provides tangible benefits to local communities living alongside rhinos. Rhinos are one of the “Big 5” animals popular on African safaris and they are a popular tourism draw in places like the Eastern Himalayas.

Threats.

Illegal Wildlife Trade

Although international trade in rhino horn has been banned under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES) since 1977, demand remains high and fuels rhino poaching in both Africa and Asia. Criminal syndicates link the killing fields in countries like South Africa through a whole series of transit points and smuggling channels on to the final destination in Asia. The main market is now in Vietnam where there is a newly emerged belief that rhino horn cures cancer. Rhino horn is also used in other traditional Asian medicine to treat a variety of ailments including fever and various blood disorders. It is also used in some Asian cultures as a cure for hangovers.
Habitat Loss

Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park in Sumatra is thought to have one of the largest populations of Sumatran rhinos, but it is losing forest cover due to conversion for coffee and rice by illegal settlers. In southern Zimbabwe, privately owned rhino conservatives have been invaded by landless people. This reduces the amount of safe habitat for rhino populations and increases the risk of poaching and snaring.
Reduced Genetic Diversity
The small size of the Javan rhino population is in itself a cause for concern. Low genetic diversity could make it hard for the species to remain viable.
Natural Disasters
Ujung Kulon National Park, home to Javan rhinos, is highly vulnerable to tsunamis and a major explosion of the Anak Krakatau volcano could easily wipe out all life in the protected area.
Disease
In recent years four Javan rhinos, including one young adult female, are thought to have died from disease, probably transmitted to wild cattle in the park and subsequently to the rhinos.

What WWF is Doing

Protecting Sumatran Rhino Habitat

In Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, the critically endangered population of 60–80 Sumatran rhinos is threatened by the conversion of forest to cash crops on both the eastern and western sides of the island’s central mountain range. WWF works with park officials to collect population data on the rhinos, and with local communities to halt deforestation and preserve and restore natural habitat. We also support antipoaching efforts in the park.

Tackling Illegal Wildlife Trade

WWF is setting up an Africa-wide rhino database using rhino horn DNA analysis (RhoDIS), which contributes to forensic investigations at the scene of the crime and for court evidence to greatly strengthen prosecution cases. In South Africa and Kenya, it has been circulated into law as legal evidence in courts and rhino management. This work is done with institutions like the University of Pretoria Veterinary Genetics Laboratory.

In Namibia, WWF we worked with the government and other partners to develop innovative new transmitters to track rhino movements and protect them against poaching. We also helped set up and promote a free and confidential phone hotline that allows people to inform the authorities about poaching safely and anonymously. WWF developed this tool with the Government of Namibia and Mobile Telecommunications Limited. Rhino poaching in Namibia is now at an all time low.

TRAFFIC, the world’s largest wildlife trade monitoring network, has played a vital role in bilateral law enforcement efforts between South Africa and Vietnam. This has gone hand-in-hand with written commitments to strengthen border and ports monitoring as well as information sharing in order to disrupt the illegal trade chain activities and bring the perpetrators to justice for their crimes against rhinos.

Stopping Forest ConversionSurveys by WWF, Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) and Sabah Foundation (SF) found the largest known Sumatran rhino population on the island of Borneo. Together we run rhino monitoring units to prevent poaching. WWF also works with local landholders, agri-businesses, and the government to stop the conversion of more than 7,722 square miles of forest to oil palm and timber plantations between Kinabatangan and Sebuku Sembakung. The destruction of this forest would likely lead to poaching of the remaining Sumatran rhinos in the area.

Monitoring And Tracking Javan Rhino’s

WWF conducts ongoing research on the Javan rhino, which continues to reveal critical information about behavioral patterns, distribution, movement, population size, sex ratio and genetic diversity. We also work closely with the Ujung Kulon National Park Authority to keep track of rhino populations. In 2010, we received camera trap footage of two Javan rhinos and two of their calves in the dense tropical rainforests of the protected area. The videos prove that one of the world’s rarest mammals are breeding. Before these camera trap images surfaced, only twelve other Javan rhino births were recorded in the past decade.

Establishing New Populations

WWF and its partners are working on the development of a program to translocate Javan rhinos from Ujung Kulon National Park to establish a new population in other suitable habitat in Indonesia. This new habitat would eliminate the threat of natural disasters and create two populations.

Monitoring And Protection Of White Rhino’s

To monitor and protect white rhinos WWF focuses on better-integrated intelligence gathering networks on rhino poaching and trade, more antipoaching patrols and better equipped conservation law enforcement officers. WWF is setting up an Africa-wide rhino database using rhino horn DNA analysis (RhoDIS), which contributes to forensic investigations at the scene of the crime and for court evidence to greatly strengthen prosecution cases. In South Africa and Kenya, it has been circulated into law as legal evidence in courts and rhino management. This work is done with institutions like the University of Pretoria Veterinary Genetics Laboratory. We also support a South African white rhino web-based data system.

Strengthening Local And International Law Enforcement

WWF supports accredited training in environmental and crime courses, some of which have been adopted by South Africa Wildlife College. Special prosecutors have been appointed in countries like Kenya and South Africa to prosecute rhino crimes in a bid to deal with the mounting arrests and bring criminals to face swift justice with commensurate penalties. TRAFFIC, the world’s largest wildlife trade monitoring network, has played a vital role in bilateral law enforcement efforts between South Africa and Vietnam. This has gone hand-in-hand with written commitments to strengthen border and ports monitoring as well as information sharing in order to disrupt the illegal trade chain activities and bring the perpetrators to justice for their crimes against rhinos.

Thoughts:

With all this information called and read through I now thin that I have a much great knowledge of the issues surrounding rhinos and what WWF is doing about it.

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WWF | Brief

So or my brief I am deciding to design for WWF, this is an organization that sole purpose is to protect endangered animal species, they are trying to do everything in there power to protect our current prime target animals from big cats like tigers and lions, to species of monkeys and gorilla’s etc. This is one of the leading companies in the world that have a vice and can make a difference with donations and charity events, Everyone with a TV has probably seen a WWf advert for adoption for an animal and even the smallest donation can make a different so I want to focus on making a charitable piece of design/ art work to be created for auction to help raise funds for them.

Picture 24

WWF’s website is very simple and has on it’s first page is a species directory with all of the endangered species that they help, straight away without saying anything about themselves they talk about the animals, so for me this is showing that they just want to help, there not in it for themselves only the animals.

Below I have collected some previous WWF advertising and to my surprise they all vary in style and design premise.

advertising-wwf2

This is the first that I collected and the message behind the image is really strong and works so well with the design, it’s all about respecting the planet this advert and for them to use shock advertising to a degree is fantastic, not often companies use this in the right places or circumstances but WWF have create a perfect advert with a really strong and important message for today.

image-5316

Something so simple as being responsible can be translated in to such a simple and basic format for people to understand is amazing, it’s always good to not over-think a design and always see if there’s something that could be achieve not in an easier way but simpler way.

WWF-poster

I was surprised to see an advert from WWF like this on a different medium rather than standard paper or card, having a backdrop like this is really clever and works so well enforcing this whole look after the planet and it’s other inhabitants and for them to use and even think of the paper they used is really clever I think because at-least for me most of the messages I get on the second look rather than the first.

wwf-posters-bb003

This time WWF are focusing on de-forestation and I would have never thought of something like this, a lot of time and thinking must go into there adverts, So even thought I have an idea for my final piece now It would be really worth me having a long thought and sketch to come up with as many different idea’s that I can because even the worse idea could be developed into the best idea that I have had?..

wwf34

Again something different, this time WWF have used something so common and used by most people in the world today a computer, they have used the icon computer mouse icon/symbol, so it connects everybody to the cause and the advert because I think it’s making them feel like they can stop this because it’s true they can stop and help prevent it all if enough of us get up and help.

wwf_poster

 

WWF have causes and issues that they are trying to help and bring to focus in today’s society, anything form animal endangerment to deforestation and chemical spills, they do it all which is a really good thing because they’re not just focusing on one thing they trying to help every issue in the world to do with the environment.

WWF_poster_2_by_starcaster

 

Another very strong and powerful message that they are focusing on, what I have learnt in this small amount of WWF research is that they do a lot more than I ever thought and they have some really strong and powerful underlying messages in the advertising and this is something that I want to translate into my work.

My next steps in this project is to write up my brief and get started with the designing of this project.

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